21 February 2013

Treasure Chest Thursday: Jewelry

Jewelry can be very difficult to photograph. I still have so much to learn about orientation and lighting. What makes these objects so difficult is their reflective nature. I learned a lot about spot metering on my digital camera when I photographed my grandfather's artifacts (a watch, military bracelet, and name bracelet, and more). I tried to apply these principles to my sorority bracelet.

Photographing Memorabilia
Notice the dark area on the ΑΓΔ face plate? Not good!


I set the bracelet directly onto the white cardboard inside my light box. Unfortunately, I don't like the orientation of this piece. The reflection (which actually includes me) is irritating. I've set this piece away for now and I started working on other items.Why be frustrated? When I learn more, I'll come back to the piece.

So, I attempted to photograph some rhinestone pins that I wore in pageants. I placed the right side of the box beside a window for natural light and I streamed tissue-paper filtered desk lamp light through the left side of the box.

Photographing pageant memorabilia
Photographing Rhinestone pins
f/5, exp 1/13, ISO 100, Spot metering, no flash

Instead of the cardboard, I placed a white piece of muslin inside my light box. Underneath the fabric, I placed some fiberfill left over from a craft project. I adjusted the 'based' until my rhinestone crown pin and my flag pin looked nice. The two objects photographed separately never looked right. I deleted them before I thought about using them in this post. Sorry! When I put these two pins together, I felt like magic was showing up in my lens.

The pins looked a little dull. So I made a few changes with where the lights were positioned.

Photographing heirlooms
Photographing Rhinestone pins
f/5, exp 1/13, ISO 100, Spot metering, no flash
Then viola! Magic! The pins sparkle and shine, as they should.

No comments:

Post a Comment

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...