31 July 2012

Tombstone Tuesday: Oops! Check Your Photos Before You Leave

My shadow while volunteering in the Green Lawn Cemetery
Do I really need to say any more? Had I taken the time to check my camera before leaving this section, I wouldn't have to request someone else to take a better photo of Effie V Baumgartner on my behalf.

Why didn't I? Well, the sun was fairly bright and I am unable to review photos I take in my LCD monitor on my digital camera very well in such lighting. But that can easily be solved by reviewing the photos while inside my car before going to a separate section.

However, this is really something I should have seen while I was framing up my shot. My kids love to laugh at this photo because of mommy being in it. They call it a grave stone blooper!

Tombstone Tuesday is a blogging prompt supported by GeneaBloggers. To participate, create a post which includes an image of a gravestone of one or more ancestors and it may also include a brief description of the image or the ancestor. Hopefully it can also include stones that you photographed for other's benefit.

11 comments:

  1. Great reminder. We were struggling with the same "shadow thing" last week while we were taking photos at a couple cemeteries. Thankfully, we were able to successfully take a few photos without our shadows being included.

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    1. I found that by using a large white foam board has blocked more shadows by creating a shadow block on the stone. Then I set the camera to compensate for the shadow and it works well.

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  2. The sun was so bright on my two recent cemetery visits that I couldn't even see what I was taking a picture of on my digital camera screen. Just crossed by fingers and hoped! I did realize on the 2nd trip, that I could usually avoid my own shadow in pictures of stones laying flat in the ground by changing my position in relation to the marker. I could take the picture as if I were reading it upside down. lol.... it wasn't really necessary for me to be able to read the marker while taking the picture. Only works for those that lie flat, unfortunately. Too bad those markers that stand upright can't turn around for us! Kathy at abbieandeveline.com

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    1. Kathy... I love the idea of lying flat. I'll have to remember that when the sun is being a pest. However, that means I'll need to wear something I don't mind getting dirty! One more thing to add to the cemetery rabbit's check list. ;)

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    2. Just to let you know your post is on my Fab Finds list at http://janasgenealogyandfamilyhistory.blogspot.com/2012/08/follow-fridayfab-finds-for-august-3-2012.html

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    3. Wow Jana. Thanks! Glad you like me enough to recommend to others.

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  3. That's funny. On sunny days, I've been known to just point and shoot because there's NO previewing with all that light. But if you're traveling, it pays to be more careful since a return trip might not be possible.

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    1. Thanks for relating your shared experience. Nice to know I'm not the only one!

      I agree that next time I'm on a trip, I'll take more care. When I'm doing local cemeteries, I can go back if I need to.

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  4. I have many 'bloopers' and there have been times when I have had to stand at very odd angles to avoid getting mt shadow in the picture. This is why I prefer overcast days, less to worry about.

    Great post!

    Beneath Thy Feet

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    1. Nicola, you're right. Overcast days can be a blessing. So long as I remember to defog the lens. But each experience brings more knowledge. Right!

      Had a thought when reading about being in weird angles when we shoot. Perhaps we should take a picture of our weird angles to document it sometime. Ahh... maybe not. It's about the stone, not the photographer, right?

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